18ct White Gold Pendant with 4.03ct Green Tanzanite and Diamonds

18ct White Gold Pendant with 4.03ct Green Tanzanite and Diamonds

9,450.00

This beautiful 18ct white gold pendant features a rare and beautiful pear shaped 4.03ct Natural 'Fancy' Green Tanzanite, set with split claw mounts within a brilliant-cut diamond micro-set halo and pendant loop.

There are 23 diamonds (total diamond weight 0.3ct, F colour and VS clarity). 

White Gold chains are available separately.

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The Tanzanite in this pendant:

This beautiful 4.03ct pear shaped Natural Green Tanzanite is 11.44mm high x 8.55mm wide x 6.67mm deep.

This Tanzanite was mined on the 8th August 2014. Mining Location: Merelani, Tanzania
It was cut by master cutters in Tanzania and then sent for laser inscription and GIA certification in Kenya.
I purchased it on the 19th September 2017.

The gemologist's comments on this stone were "Stunning, rare Green Tanzanite. Classic collector's / investor's gemstone. Not often found in the market and rarely mined, stones like these are a real pleasure to own. Strongly trichroic, as to be expected of a Tanzanite, displaying green, violet and blue in the Dichroscope. Gorgeous and rare."

The rough, before cutting.

The rough, before cutting.

The cut stone.

The cut stone.

Gem Certificate

Gem Certificate

Mining report

Mining report

 

About Tanzanite:

The Merelani Mining area beneath Mount Kilimanjaro is the only known source of Tanzanite in the world. This makes the stone considerably rarer than Diamonds and one with a finite resource. It is believed that the eruption of Mount Kilimanjaro was responsible for setting off the unique set of conditions in the earth which caused Tanzanite to form. 

Whilst the formation of blue Tanzanite was caused by the presence of Vanadium in the earth, the presence of other minerals caused a very rare occurrence of other colours to form too. These wonderful “fancy colour Tanzanites” (as they are known in the trade) are very seldom found as the minerals that were responsible for their colour were only present in minute quantities at the time of formation. Crystals with colours other than blue include pink, orange and a variety of greens. They are very rare and much sought after gemstones.

The Tanzanites I purchase are cherry picked from the mouth of the mine by a GIA Gemologist, chosen out of literally thousands of carats of Tanzanite production. This gives my Investment Grade Collection a pedigree that very few people will ever own or even see. If you are looking for jewellery in the highest grade in Tanzanite, the very top 1%, I can source them.

Caring for Tanzanite

Tanzanite is not a gem that should break easily but due to its relatively low score on the Mohs Scale of hardness (6) it can scratch more easily than other gems like Ruby and Sapphire.Due to Tanzanite's relative softness, it should be treated with respect. Gems with a hardness of 6-7 or greater are quite suitable for rings which are worn occasionally. But for a ring like a wedding or engagement ring, intended for everyday wear over a period of years, a hardness rating of 10 to 8 is recommended. To clean it, never use an ultrasonic cleaner or steam cleaner (often found in jewellers). The best method is simply to use a toothbrush and warm, soapy water.

How is Tanzanite formed?

Many hundreds of millions of years ago, shifting plates caused a massive upheaval in the earth’s crust forcing it upwards over 19,000 feet to form the majesty of what is known today as Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest mountain. The visual feast of the ice capped peak towering over endless plains of wildlife has mesmerised many over the centuries but what was created below ground as the volcano erupted continues to mesmerise a few who are lucky enough to own a piece of it – Tanzanite! 

The eruption created the unique set of conditions in the earth for this wonderful gem to form over 500 million years ago. Heated ground waters circulated through rock fractures, dissolving minerals from the surrounding rocks and redepositing them in open spaces like fractures. Here as the rock folded with time, the heat and pressure grew to a level where it was possible for Tanzanite to form. Much of the first crystal formations would have been destroyed by the folding rock over the ages or by a change in temperature or pressure but some survived and the pair of crystals pictured on the left were amongst these. They were chiseled out of the rock several hundred feet down by resolute miners and brought up to the surface.